I made a oops


#1

Ok some of you have been helping me a lot. THANK YOU FOR THAT!! I appreciate it.

With that. Last week I ordered my first door hangers. 1000 of them. I put a promo code on there for 10 windows at $99. This week I focused on building my facebook page and website. Once my facebook was active I put the same offer on facebook. 10 windows inside and out for $99. That day I got a call to book a job!!! YAY! I spent $.69 on my advertisement and got a job. So the lady wanted me to give her an estimate for the rest of the house. Well I had the customer send me pictures of the house. I then started to bid. I did not even think about it before making the ad but my normal price for windows was going to be $5 inside and out $3 for tracks and $2 for screens. Once is started the bid I realized I was not giving the lady any discount and instantly felt bad. I took down the facebook ad until I figure out my pricing better. A bid I could normally count up pretty quick took me two hours. I didnt know how to not screw her over. THEN IT CLICKED! I just ordered 1000 door hangers with the same ad running. Thank goodness Vistaprint was able to change my discount. I just gave a dollar amount off instead of a 10 window discount. I am new. Very new. It was my first residential bid and I pooped myself.


#2

10 windows for $99 - run with it. Ask her to pick the windows and if she wants more windows done, it’s normal rate.

I wouldn’t change anything.


#3

ditto to what jared said, 10 windows for $99 doesn’t need to be a special price or discounted rate it’s just letting people know the price for 10 Windows which I think it’s helpful.


#4

PS technically it is $1 off


#5

Ya just run with it like Jared and Ben said.

10 windows for $99
Put that offer back up.


#6

Keep the offer and revisit your normal pricing.

$5 per window in and out is $2.50 one side. Rather low?
Many folks (depending on market area) are charging $8.00 to $12+ in and out. ($4 to $6 per side).

You can make up for it for the length of the promo by upping your track and screen charge after the promo of 10, or upping your window charge beyond 10 windows. Easy fix.


#7

I assumed he meant $5 per pane - $10 per double hung… ?


#8

It reads $5 inside and outside, should we assume he is only cleaning one of two panes of the window inside?
I think for clarity of discussion and assistance from us one side should be clear that it is one window side per price?


#9

Adjust as needed…


#10

Here’s something you should watch for.

10 windows for $99.
I’D want to make sure I’m cleaning more than 10 hand picked windows on a 30 window house.

The discount is only valid if I clean the full home. Perhaps it’s something you should consider.

I’D rather clean 1 house with 30 windows than 4 houses with 10.


#11

I agree, don’t change anything. 10 windows in and out for $99 is a good deal. If they have more windows you can bid them at the normal rate. $7 window, $3 tracts and sill, $2 for screens. Say they have 20 windows first 10 are $99 then next 10 are $120. Total is $219 for 20 windows in and out. Then if you want to offer them a deal to book the service you can offer all the windows at the special price. Brings it to $198 if they get on the schedule today.

Its up to you but you are on the right track. Just something to think about my first offer when I started was 20 windows in/out with tracts and sills for $199. Plus free screen cleaning. Now if the house had no screens it was still $199 because the screen cleaning was free. If it was included in the price the customer with no screens would have wanted a discount. But you can’t discount free. Just something to think about. Hang in there.

Joe


#12

Ok. I have no idea where to start here lol. So when I started to plan the window cleaning business I initially thought I would do $5 dollars outside $8 dollars outside and inside. $2 dollars for tracks and $2 per screen. This is first story pricing. Second story I was thinking 10 dollars outside only and 13$ out/in. Same for tracks and screens. Storms $15 each maybe more. I watched the service industry coach how to price a residential house. He said that the average rate in his area was $5 dollars outside and inside, couple dollars for tracks, sills and screen. His home town is about the same size as my home town so that is comparable and I live 45 min from Michigan. So that is also comparable. I ended up sending her a outside only price of all 30 windows for $174 and full service for $376 I believe. Like my previous posts. My area is not a wealthy area. So I need to figure out how to price these homes. I would say an average cookie cutter home with a middle/upper class family would make a average of 130,000. Average house hold here prob only making 60,000. Very little upper class I would say less then 20 neighborhoods. I will attach some images of our towns higher end neighborhoods


#13

She’ll probably come back at $300 for full service. Some people like to haggle, especially “not a wealthy area”. That would be about the same price as the special rate for all of them. I liked the 10 for $99 offer too.
If she responded to that offer, then she should be willing to do $10 per window on all of them (my bet anyway).


#14

You should consider this offer a reflection on your MINIMUM. Go with it. You can always price those first ten lower in a bid for ALL the windows. Your offer is basically what you are willing to show up and do some work for. Don’t sweat the small stuff…

If someone wants JUST ten windows, then the price is clear. If someone has 20, 30, or 40 windows, you bid it where you are happy. The client doesn’t have to know your pricing break down, just the price for the work they want done.


#15

Ok. So above is our biggest neighborhood that would buy our services. This is our upper end homes. I would say average home here is 200,000 with a few prob 300,000. This is the top of the line in my town. If you live in this neighborhood your considered wealthy in my home town.


#16

This is our rich neighborhood. I say the homes here are prob 350,000- 750,000. That is the only neighborhood that we very wealthy individuals living. My target area is low. Overall I do not want my pricing to be to high that nobody buys the service. This is why I kinda adopted the average Michigan price.


#17

Wealthy people don’t always just live in housing additions. Sometimes they live in the rural areas not jammed into housing additions.

The vast majority of the wealthy in my area live on lakes and sub divisions by golf courses. But there are still wealthy people who live in rural areas not in those mentioned areas.

I find my target audience is:
1 Women. I have hardly EVER had a man call for an estimate.
2 40+ years old. Younger people don’t seem to call for a window cleaner. (most are 50-60’s)
3 No young kids living at home.
4 Husband and/or wife are/were professionals of some sort. Meaning NOT blue collar type people.
5 Homes are well maintained. They care how their homes look, so they are more likely to pay someone to keep it nice.

You may want to get in with some of the real estate people in your area. Clean windows sell homes better and they can lead you to the type of people you are looking to work with.


#18

Great post James.


#19

When figuring out your pricing and estimating process, my advice is to keep things as simple as you possibly can. Everyone has their unique method, but ultimately you’ll find simplicity helps a lot.


#20

Also remember that some folks are cash rich and property poor, and others are property rich and cash poor. So try not to second guess too much about who and how much is affordable. Set fair prices for your market. If you can’t make a living then your prices are too low.