Fabricating debris frustrations... Plastic scrapers?


#1

So we’ve all seen these stickers before. You’re probably like, “Right, now tell me how to get this stupid sticker off without a scraper…!!!”

My question is, has anyone actually tried the plastic scrapers? The story is that the FD can become embedded in the scraper and cause much more damage than just a metal scraper. But has anyone had the opportunity to test that out? And why are they still recommending this option if it really can do that?

Btw, these Simpson doors had Old Castle glass in them… [facepalm]

@Gary_Mauer, @dexter445, or anyone else?


#2

I use epoxy scrapers, they work kinda you just need to use chems to soften most debris to be able to easily remove.


#3

run away, the faster the better


#4

I got the sticker off with some aggressive scrubbing with bronze wool. But it took 10x longer than it would have with a scraper.

@Steve076, could you elaborate on your process? What are epoxy scrapers? And which chems are you using?

I have a ccu coming up with heavy paint/stain. I can scrape everything but the tempered glass. Those sliding doors take forever with bronze wool. Sodium hydroxide (oven cleaner) cuts through the stain a little, but I hate using the stuff.


#5

Side question: does anyone know if Marvin has been outsourcing their glass from Old Castle? I’ve found that they seem to just be riddled with FD lately :rage:


#6

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#7

I avoid my 6" scraper on tempered glass. I wet paper stickers down soaked and surgically remove them with a 1.5" pocket razor, then hit the whole pane with steel wool or white pad.


#8

http://www.theskrapr.com/the_original_skrapr/index.html.
Depends on the debris to what chems are going to break down its bond, solvents to break down paints , cement off to break down mortar.
Its more about inspecing the glass and whats on it then work out what you need to loosen the bonds on each debris then once loosened then remove with skrapr.


#9

heat stickers up with a blow dryer and a lot of times you can just peel them right off.

Marvin has always had bad glass @Alex_Lacey


#10

I’ve used them… they’re everything you heard/thought/feared they would be.

That being said, it’s probably been 20 years since…
So, maybe they’ve finally realized the ridiculousness of suggesting them in the first place.

Nah. I forgot who we’re talking about.


#11

I am more in favor of not using plastic scrapers. Bad tempered glass needs to be brought to the attention of the customer. We have people in our industry who have studied this issue with much passion. Many of them suggest having a waiver signed. This is certainly not a bad practice. I have been called out on several consulting jobs involving Fabrication Debris. Educating my customers has never been difficult. They are always amazed. So I am more in favor of educating our customers.

Henry


#12

I tried one last summer (2015), never used them again. They were even worse than a regular blade