Why Does ANYONE Need To Pay For The ANSI/IWCA I-14?


#1
  • Do you think it’s right to charge people to learn how to do things safely?
  • Yes
  • No

0 voters

Today I was going over the Scope of Work for a couple Federal buildings I just won down at the border, and was handed a copy of the SOW and in THEIR writing (whoever writes for them) under the section where I’m responsible it says that I need to be ANSI/IWCA I-14 compliant!

My hands started shaking I was so pissed off. First off, its not relevant for the job so its not an issue…but its the principle that I’m freaken pissed at.

How is it that they were able to get that written into RFP’s in the first place, and why is it that if I am to learn how to do it safely I NEED TO PAY!?

Do you have to pay to learn what the safety standards on a boom lift are? How about on the use of a freaken ladder?
So why is it, that ANSI is going to endorse a scheme to make cash on what is supposed to be a service to the industry?

All of you IWCA members, please enlighten me. If I’m out of line, please tell me how that is.

Personally speaking, I’m asking someone to tell me how I’m wrong. I used to have respect for the IWCA. Not anymore. Someone help me get it back.


#2

Nobody wants to touch this one huh?


#3

So I did not really fully understanding. So they want you to be paid member of lWCA?


#4

No. In order to be compliant with I-14 standards, I have to know what it says right? In order to know that, I have to pay for it.


#5

Maybe call osha and see if they can give you a copy? I think learning how to be safe is always on the business regardless of industry. Who else would pay for you to have knowledge?


#6

Honestly I am very unfamiliar with you guys laws ( its normally a lack of lol)
I know here I am required to obtain a training certification for many individual aspects of the work we perform each of these is a paid training session, ranging from $100-$1500 depending on the particular module( $1500 is for 5 day IRATA course)

But I had to be trained and assessed in safely working at heights that was $280, unrestricted boom/EWP over 11meters was $480, white card (construction induction training ) is around $100.

While I understand that all these costs add up, but here if you are caught without the ticket you are required to have you will face fines up to $20,000 for the individual and 10x that for the company.


#7

You want to wash your windows or friends/family’s windows for free, you don’t need a license or insurance, You want to charge for it, you need a license and insurance.

If you want to pursue certain types of work, you will need certain certifications. It’s all part of owning/having a business. I don’t see the problem.


#8

The Only guidelines that im aware of that we need to abide by are OSHA 29 CFR 1910 (walking-working surfaces). it was updated november 18 2016. That’s what we fall under. Hope this helps brother. it also sates that your equipment should be ANZI. Z-35.9 approved, concerning equipment your using should be of appropriate material and that the design is suitable for the intended task and meets its required standards.


#9

If you wanna do work with a particular company and they Have specific requirements you must follow them if you want that job.

As far as IWCA, I wouldn’t give them the time of day, with that sad I have paid $50 for their copy of the IWCA safety standards because it is a required piece of safety information to have knowledge of in my area.

Yes they should charge for it, it’s a program they developed, put the time and effort into that development.


#10

Thanks for you guys’ opinions. I agree with you.

IF this was a certification.

ITS NOT.

Its a standard. A standard for safety is normally public.

These are non profit organizations aren’t they?

Someone had to take time to write the title 8 for OSHA didn’t they? I only have to read it to know how to stay alive.

Its free.

I’m not convinced fellas.


#11

They charge a membership fee to join don’t they? Doesn’t sound like a non profit to me. Sounds like an organization.

I don’t know that I would call it a “standard” as in across the board. The IWCA isn’t OSHA. They can’t make laws or regulations and fine you. But I would say these are “rules” adopted by some in the industry, that IF you want to work with them, you play the game and follow the rules.


#12

I think you’re just confused on the identity of osha compared to IWCA and what their roles are


#13

Ok.

But if its not a standard why is it called the ANSI/IWCA I 14?

The ANSI part makes me think its a standard.


#14

How much are they charging for what you posted?


#15

$50 from what I was able to find


#16

Speaking for myself, I find that a rather small amount to pay to get a multi-thousand dollar contract with a government cleaning job.

I’d just pay it, do the work and collect the cheque.


#17

But at the end of the day its just a book, just information about a safety standard.
ALL other safety standards are freely available why isn’t this one.


#18

Many RFP’s include language requiring ANSI/IWCA I.14 compliance, especially government work. Unlike free OSHA regulations from the government, you do have to purchase of most industries standards in any trade. However, once OSHA absorbs an “industry standard” into its regulations, or writes it’s own, the old standard created by and for the industry is basically moot.

That happened on Jan 20, 2017 with the new revised OSHA 1910 Walking/working surface regulations. And like all OSHA regs, it’s free to review online. This is the new body of regulation that can be the basis for fines, and fully enforced by OSHA.

Basically, it replaces the industry standard (the old I.14) that OSHA could choose to enforce, because a lack of any specific OSHA regulations on the topic. That was the case for many years, putting the onus the IWCA to create a standard to self regulate, which they did. The I.14 was created by volunteers in the IWCA essentially to try to end the cowboy era of rope descent work (though it did address other types of work), and give OSHA something to work with, until OSHA regs caught up. OSHA took a looooooong time to catch up, but now they have.

The content of the ANSI/IWCA I.14 still has value, but is not what OSHA will enforce now. We’ve just began to see RFP’s begin changing their language, removing the I.14 reference, but it will be a while before it goes away completely.

I have no opinion on the matter, this is simply the current state of affairs.


#19

Yeah just pretend that they are asking you to buy a fifty dollar special window cleaning squeegee to complete the work… Trick yourself in to thinking it’s just a squeegee lol and then collect that massive paycheque buddy!!


#20

Congratulations! Since you were able to successfully bid on Federal RFPs you will probably be more competitive for future RFPs. Some RFPs award points for previous Federal work that was satisfactorily completed.