What's your magic number?


#1

I was courious to know how many customers you would feel good about having, if your average was $200 per window clean job.

I think mine would be within a few years to have 120 customers on a solid bi annual cleaning schedule do you think I’m aiming low or too high?


#2

Focus on the jobs that will give you the highest return per hour, not the number of clients or your average price per job. A small compony or solo guy typically has to go for a high rate of return at a lower volume (quite a few guys on the forum), whereas a bigger company is usually at a lower rate of return and a larger volume. I received an unusual number of new clients this season at $80-$100/hr and just didn’t solicit some of my regulars. I’ve got a few that consistently pay late so I’ll be getting rid of them too.


#3

Keep in mind as well, that’s only 24K gross. You have to pay expenses and taxes out of that. Probably not many people are going to hit that number,


#4

How much would you like to net per year? Figure all expenses from your gross goal and decide if your net is enough for you. If not sell more, if you over shot the mark take a vacation.


#5

$48k gross is too low. A full time solo operator should be shooting for $70k-$100k+, depending on their market and living expenses. After taxes, health insurance, and general business expenses, you can plan on keeping around 60%.

As @Wagonhound mentioned, don’t focus on the number of jobs so much as the profitability of the work you’re doing. Your time is finite. Figure out what gets you the most return for your time. You don’t have the leverage of “other people’s time” like bigger companies, so you have to leverage other aspects, such as your efficiency, labor saving equipment, and higher $ services.


#6

“shooting for” is key in that statement. Never been solo (I was for 2 weeks and it was glorious) but every solo guy I know and trust has never made close to 100k.

I am sure someone is doing it but not many


#7

Being a one man operation with other services wrapped up into business $48k is decent but this would only be a short term goal for me as I would want to increase volume and profit margins as time went on as well as expand business from one man to more. Thanks for the input guys appreciate it.


#8

A $200 average times 120 customers is only $24,000. You will need to have double that ticket average or twice as many customers, to hit 48K…


#9

Bi annually


#10

Every six months spring and fall cleaning


#11

I agree with you there. I believe there are a small handful of solo guys actually pulling down $100k gross (myself not included - I might close out this year around $85k). Most of them probably workaholics who have little time to post here between april and november… ringing any bells, ‘buddy’? :smirk:

Power washing opens up a whole new realm of possibilities, though. Had I started 12 years ago as a ‘primarily power washing business that also does windows’, I would (fairly) easily be grossing $125k+ by this point.


#12

Maybe you can sell it to every client, but I never have. Some only do once a year, some 3-4 times, some do monthly on certain sides of the home…


#13

I bet I could pull it off. It would be horrible at my age, but do-able.
Last year my storefront routes grossed around $75K. In the winter I do it all, in warmer months with part-time help, but I could do all of it all year over 4 days per week. If I averaged $500 one day/week for residential over let’s say 38 weeks- that’s another $19K. I can easily do $6K in power washing on weekends or do that instead of window cleaning on the 5th weekday and hit that number.
Not that it wouldn’t drive me batty and make me wonder why I’m killing myself :wink: