What percentage do you take for subcontracted work that comes from other Window Cleaning companies?


#1

I’m wanting to branch out a but and take on some opportunities that have been offered to me like subcontracted work or jobs that belong to other Window Cleaning companies. I’ve been hearing different numbers thrown around as to what percent window cleaners take for sub work.

I have one company that gives me 80% for any work I do for them. I have my own truck, equipment, water fed pole (if needed), license, insurance, etc.

What percent do you take?

Thanks!


#2

I would think 80% is probably on the high end…the last time I did any it was around 60%.
I would much rather bid each job and forget the percentages. If they like the bid great if not oh well.


#3

60% and 65% for me. Never seen 80%, that’s a lot to give away for a company.


#4

If that’s what you guys get for your take of doing the work, being insured and providing tools/equipment, I don’t think I would ever want to sub ANY work…

I would not accept any less than 80%, and they better be pricing the jobs good. I started a business to make money, not work for someone else for peanuts.

No offense to those of you who do it, I just wouldn’t for such a small slice of the pie.


#5

Did u mean, you would rather get your own jobs and bid them yourself than to do sub work for other companies? If so, same here. But when there’s a shortage of work I’m up for doing some sub work to keep some money coming in.


#6

I can see what u mean from the perspective of the company subbing out the work. But from the standpoint of the professional window cleaning technician, the tech is doing all of the work, has their own tools, insurance, etc. The company is doing nothing but booking the work.


#7

I’m with you on the 80% deal. I feel like that’s a fair number. Especially, considering when a window cleaner has all of their own tools, insurance, etc. We gotta make our money for doing the work and for having to pay for expenses, insurance, gas, taxes, etc.


#8

Little more to it than “doing nothing but booking the work”. I’ve been on both sides and as a business owner you also have to pay: insurance, gas, taxes, advertising, promotions, marketing, labor, rent, utilities, phone, office equipment, supplies, etc…so let’s say I send you out on a well priced $400 job, I’d keep $80. Can’t run a business on that. But having said all that, nothing wrong with asking that amount and more power to you if you get it. As well, it gives you room to come down if you really want to fill in your schedule by doing sub work.


#9

Mmm :thinking:… all depends on how you’re using subs.

If you’re treating them like employees, then yeah, you’ve got all that overhead related to the work they do.

But if you’re passing off a few overflow jobs to a trusted contractor who does the work independently and with little involvement from you, then all you have is the cost of acquisition (which is sort of nill, since you likely would have lost that customer if you couldn’t fit them in your schedule), and office time for booking and invoicing the work.

Under that scenario, I think 20% is a decent cut. 30% would be nicer, and still probably worth it from the perspective of most contractors who are short on work.


#10

I guess what I mean is basically bid for what you are going to sub for if possible . Why back when I had issues with companies that I was subbing from not being real honest… I definitely get wanting to stay busy.


#11

70% 80 % 60%. Means a hill of beans until I see the job. I couldn’t careless how much you make , as long as I’m happy with what I’m making.

So send me pics or let me go see , an I’ll let ya know.

I would do each an every job this way, or you will regret it, or it will be short lived.


#12

It really comes down to supply in demand. A person who has enough work can risk not getting more.


#13

No … it comes down to whether, or not I feel it’s fair
When someone wants to sub me a job I say ok let me look at , An I’ll give you a price. I look at the job an figure my price I would do it for. Then I put the discount in.
To me 70 % is fair so if I normally do a job at 500. I’ll tell them I’ll do it for you at 350.

Dude I’m only getting 400. We’ll that’s not my problem. Learn how to price

Dude I can’t give you 70 % , then your being greedy bro !

Good luck to ya !!!

Just Becuse your desperate don’t let another contractor take advantage of you.
I’drather go knocking on doors ,An do everything. Half price for a regular customer ,then another window cleaner playing me for a fool.

So to the OP 80% is real nice , as long as the jobs are priced right. It’s very generous. Thank you sir :smile:


#14

Everything in business is about supply and demand and everyone has their own goals, likes and dislikes. Some don’t like sales and would rather have consistent work coming rather than uncertainty. If you suddenly lost all your clients, you’d soon find a change of attitude.


#15

An everyone in business needs to be profitable, or soon you will be out of business
The contractor Subbing me work should understand this. If not I’ll let him know.
Good Sub contractors are hard to find so pay them fair. I’ll let him know that too.


#16

Good subcontractors aren’t subcontractors for long, they use subcontracting to fill gaps in schedule to assist with keeping a full workload.


#17

If we think about the entertainment industry, artist manager gets about 15-20% for networking and booking the shows/gigs. But the artist is the one that’s really bringing in the money for their performance. I’m no artist, but I’m sure u get my point. :grin:

But I hear you. Perhaps it’s not “just booking the work” for a company subbing out work. There’s more to it but in my opinion a fair and larger percentage should go to the person doing the work.

Thanks for the advice! :sunglasses::ok_hand:t4:


#18

Alex, Makes perfect sense to me.


#19

Oh for sure! Whenever I can, I bid the jobs myself.


#20

That’s a good point. You never know if they did a good job bidding the job before trying to pass it on to you. I’m going to try that! Thanks!