What is your favorite


#1

scraper???


#2

4" scrapemaster is the safest for “newbies” to handle and learn with. we do a lot of new construction and feel safer with the scrapemaster


#3

The MK3 rocks because I can use it nose to glass or on a pole.


#4

oops… forgot to specify. I meant the MK3 [B]angled[/B] rocks.


#5

i do like the champion 5" angled a hell of alot.


#6

Why, I can’t understand why this scraper is angled like a wonky T & not with a lean towards the glass?


#7

My perception was that it was for ergonomic purposes (like the original 4" Unger ErgoTec® Scraper.)


#8

Dont forget the


#9

I still like the


Bill from Boston


#10

I use the standard Triumph 6" with stainless steel blades. with an added metal ring I got from a saddle shop that secures it tightly (more so than the velcro strap that comes with it). The metal ring slides over the top of the holster and slides down just above the handle of the scraper. When I reach for the scraper with one hand I slide the metal ring upwards and off of the main holster but it stays (hangs) on the strap that is connected to my belt. I can take the scraper out of the holster or put it back in quickly with one hand which is convenient and safe when up on ladders.


#11

why would anyone put a scraper on a pole considering the fabricating debris issue?


#12

With customer education and a waiver in place, what would be the issue if one scrapes via a pole?


#13

I myself am not too crazy about pole scraping. Even though proper education provided by you to the customer is important,i feel as though you just dont have the same control with the scraper on a pole as opposed to “by hand”

Plus…its hard to detect if your scratching or not partly…because your sight & possible sound of “dislodgement” is nil. In the past there was even talk about having a scraper attached to a WFP another idea im not too keen on.

My experience has been pure water has less drag coupled with working at heights that are extreme is a… recipe for disaster in the event you are contending with poor quality heat treated glass.

Although im all for proper customer education and all… just because you have a waiver doesn’t entitle you scratching up glass.


#14

So, what is your process for those occasions where you were required to hand scrape, did not realize fabricating debris was present, scratching occured, and you found out later?


#15

None! I always know if/when im contending with poor quality heat treated glass.

I have a keen eye my friend;)


#16

Oh yeah, I forgot…

So, as an IWCA Fabricating Debris Committee member, what process do you recommend someone to follow for those occasions where they were required to hand scrape, did not realize fabricating debris was present, scratching occurred, and they found out later?

BTW, I never stated that anyone was entitled to scratch glass simply because a waiver and education were in place.


#17

To answer the 1st paragraph…hopefully they educated the client/builder etc.along with a signed waiver. Then if called on it ask them what part of the waiver they did not understand?

Paragraph 2…i never said you specifically,although your well aware of some who do think a signed waiver is a green light to keep on scraping even if a poor quality surface is detected.


#18

The Fabricating Debris Committee’s position is to ask the customer what part of the waiver they didn’t understand?!?

I mentioned due you brought it up after my post and I was the only one to discuss education and waiver this thread.

I am not aware of anyone thinking that a signed waiver is a green light. To whom do you refer? Gary?

Is scraping with a pole the result of someone believing they have a green light (your term)?


#19

I believe you have a unique way to twist things around.For the record the TGQ committee has nothing to do with my personal reply,if…i have any issue’s which i haven’t thats exactly what i ask them!

Again…my belief about pole scraping is just that… mine! I dont say pole scraping is bad but…it can get real ugly if you wind up pole scraping poor quality heat treated glass.

As for you being the 1st to bring up education on this particular thread i guess that puts you on the cutting edge huh?


#20

I didn’t twist anything – I asked for your recommendation as a member of that committee, and you provided an answer. Your first answer was really no answer, I’m sure you’ll agree.

It sounds as though you stated that it should be avoided. That seems contrary to the message IWCA, AUWC, MWCoA, Gary, and Dan are stating.

It can get real ugly with hand scraping face to the glass, too.

You’ve obviously missed the point…