WFP pump - What do I really need?


#1

What do I really need so I can always have the right pressure for wfp?

I love this cool setup:

But I don’t want to do a bunch of DIY. Is there something portable, reliable, and simple that I can just buy and use straight away?


#2

Following.


#3

Check out my set up. Super easy and efficient.


#4

Nice vid, Seth. Really helpful to see a complete set-up like that.


#5

As much as I like Seth’s setup, I’m working out of a small pick-up and need something more portable that I can just take with me on an as-needed basis. Does anyone else have any thoughts on this?


#6

A Wayne PC4 pump. No battery, just plug it in when you need it.

I mounted mine to a pine 2x6 and have a 1 1/2" dowel for a handle across the top. That way I can carry it like a tool box. I just used plumbers tape to strap it to the board, and drilled holes half the board depth for the feet.


#7

I just finished ordering that pump. The last two days I was working on steep hillside properties with inadequate water pressure. It was unnecessary wear and tear on my body and took longer than WFP work should.


#8

James, can you control the pressure on that pump? Also, can you safely stop the flow on your pole while the pump is running (e.g. kinking the hose or using a univalve)?


#9

Benefit to building this is having the same plugs on outside of box that works with what you work with daily.

Easily transform it to pump stored pure water, add pressure before or after purewater system.

I even use it to wash my car, trailer anything really.


#10

No, no control on the pump other than plugging it in or unplugging it.

Yes, you can kink the hose and shut off the water flow to the brush, but it comes with problems (the way my system is set up. I use a wash-it and it has the push fits for the WFP line. So at the pressure the pump creates, when you kink the hose, it will push the hose out a little and let some water spray at the DI. It’s never totally blown off, but I don’t kink the hose when running the pump anymore.


#11

Seth has the best set up for dealing with low water pressure on jobs. You are not effected at the brush and always have the same flow on every job. If you have a small vehicle or truck you can adapt this design with a 35 gallon tank.


#12

Ya I agree wiTh Johm

All you need is a pump the one Seth has perfect !!
A marine battery. If you don’t know how to wire it fine someone that does.
It’s pritty simple. Lol , but I needed someone.
Here are some pics of how I’m rolling.

My flow controller :grimacing:


#13

You can get whatbever size tank fits in your pick up, but keep in mind less than fifty you’ll be having to fill up for the most part
I’m doin 3 houses today 50 is enough for the size houses I’m cleaning.


#14

I was having pressure issues all the time as well. I ended up building a little pump box with a pump, battery, and PWM speed controller all in the smallest husky brand tool box that my home depot carries. I think it’s similar to what people mention above but to be honest I didn’t watch the video. Overall build cost was right at about $200 if I remember correctly. While I would like a slightly stronger pump in it if I can find one for the right price, this was the solution I finally settled on after wasting about $1000 on other pumps. Not every property you work at will have an electrical hookup available for use. It works using my Xero Pure as well as hooked to my 35 gallon tank straight to my WFP. Using a rinse bar isn’t really possible if I use over 300’ of xero hose after the pump, but due to scratching issues with the rinse bar I’m just going with the jets in the brush from now on anyway. Using those I have gone about 600’ on the hose and it seems just fine.

I share this because I wish I knew what would work before spending way too much in trial and error. I haven’t perfected the inside of the box to be pretty or anything, but it works solid which is what counts. I’m kinda busy this weekend but will do my best to throw up some pics or a short video within a day or two if possible. For a small fee I’d even build these to sell. It makes all the difference to ease of working conditions though. I was going to share it once I perfected the design a bit, but since you mentioned the same issue I’d be uncool to not spread the word.


#15

This was my set up 8 years ago. I never filled that tank except by accident a few times. Normally 100 gallons would last about 3 to 4 days if I just did route work and residential. I also did not have a flow control till a few years later. I loved that Transit van. Lots of room. https://youtu.be/HXACdztm4C0


#16

Here is what I have been running for the last year or so- works good for what I’m doing:


#17

How do you power the 110 pump?


#18

I have a extension cord on a reel that I run to the customer or business to their 110 outlet. This set up works great 95% of the time where I have access to water and power, I always let the customer know I will need water/power during the estimate process.


#19

Nice set up for sure. You have so much room in your trailer, have you ever thought about adding a water tank and just drawing from that. Just add a tank and a battery and you wouldn’t have to worry about not having water or power at a customers house/business.

Super clean set up I really like. Where did you get the rollers on the door?


#20

Here is where I got the rollers to run the WFP tubing out the closed doors:

Coxreels 4RB Heavy Gauge Powder Coated Steel 4-Way Roller Bracket, 1/4-3/4 Size, Blue https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00GYVMIL8/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_xsMtBb1MQ0FKP

As to why I do not run a tank, I really have never needed to. When I do big commercial work running 2 poles for 8 hours a tank wouldn’t cut it. I like having to never worry about water- and with 500 feet of tubing I have yet to run into a situation where I couldn’t get access. Like I said, not sure this is the best setup for everyone- but it’s workimg great for me :+1:t3: