WFP Leaked large amount of water into house?


#1

So I just finished a job about an hour and a half ago, of which I used my WFP on. Nobody was home while I did the job.

I just got a call from the property manager stating that the client came home and was outraged that someone had sprayed all of her windows with a hose, which additionally caused an excessive amount of leaking inside onto her wooden floors. Now they are freaking out that I have damaged their wooden floors…

Has anyone heard of such a thing? Occasionally ill see a single drip go down the inside of a window, but I didn’t even see anything like this occur on this job. In addition, these are extremely expensive high impact hurricane windows/doors, which makes even less sense. Its in an extremely high income neighborhood.

Im currently waiting for a callback from the property manager after he goes to inspect what had happened…


#2

Ill also accept tips on how to handle this!!!

Im already a bit pissed off at how the property manager accused me of using a hose and stating they never should have hired me… but I’m trying to keep cool. Been in business for more than 10 years by the way


#3

Yup, if they’re old windows or sucky windows, you can definitely get some in. On those houses, I do a window, go back in and check everything, drop a towel if I have to or whatever. But for an outside only clean… yeah, good luck.

I’d just tell him that I use the latest in industry technology and I wasn’t aware that your windows were not properly sealed. I doubt that it would ruin a hardwood floor, might just have to pay for clean up. I think if you were using hot water, you might mess up a floor.


#4

Thanks for the response!

I just added on to my original post that these are very expensive, high impact, hurricane windows and doors. I did state to her that its an issue with the window/door manufacturer, and I wasn’t informed of any sealant issues before the job.

Got a bit of a chuckle when she tried explaining to me the “proper” way to clean windows, with a rag and a squeegee.


#5

This is information that would be valuable to someone cleaning windows. If the WFP “caused” water to enter the home, then so does a rain storm.


#6

Sounds wonky to me bro, doesn’t make sense. Something else is a foot. I would go back asap and figure this out myself if I were you, because it’s so easy to blame the window cleaner, even if it’s something else that is the problem.


#7

After I flooded the brand spanking new condo of a client I put it in each contract that we are not responsible for any water leakage into a structure. Also that all windows and doors must be fully closed and that we are not responsible for any aged or compromised seals.

Luckily the leaks happened because of a construction flaw and the owner pursued the builder and won. Dodged a bullet.

I feel for you. I’d go back and figure it out asap.


#8

An issue like this would demand my immediate attention. Just to protect myself I would insist on checking this out personally.

Make the firm request to go check this out because under normal conditions there should be no water leakage to the inside of the home with the equipment used.

Moving forward, if there is claimed damage you must see it personally. Really check the seals, and be sure the water damage, if any could be from your technique.

Seems odd to get that much water inside, heck even if a window was slightly open there shouldn’t be really enough to cause much puddling even.


#9

I have had that happen, usually around doors when I wash down the whole door with the wfp and the doors are just not sealed tight at the bottom.
I also had a time on a second story office…doing it at 7am…and the way the windows are I can’t really see what I’m doing near the bottom of the window…so I’m putting my pole up, with water running and suddenly I heard someone yelling so I look across and up and the street…nothing…then I hear the window slam shut…So I was standing there looking around with the wfp just spraying water all over this guys office…


#10

Thanks everybody for the responses.

The property manager just got back to me and luckily their client was blowing the entire thing out of proportion. They sent this picture to me showing the actually “leakage”. A tiny amount, onto tile.

They said they would get back to me in the morning to see if the drops dry clear or not, which they definitely will. My TDS was measuring at 4ppm.

Thanks again everyone for the reassurance. At least I know how to handle it in case its an actually issue next time.


#11

Who’s waiting for then to dry? It’s a TILE floor. Towel that sucka.


#12

They got a dog?


#13

So you dodged a bullet, let this be a wake up call for ya.

Remember another little thing tho, more often than not, you will find windows that have an over hang that rain won’t touch or even directly under the eaves sometimes, the glaziers or whoever installs them won’t caulk it or seal it at all because they know they can get away with it.

I’ve seen this countless times and have had a ton of leaky windows.

Kurt Kempton had an awesome idea I plagiarized years ago…on his estimate form on the very bottom there was a very cool disclaimer that said something along the lines that if water gets in the house that theres a very slight chance, if it rains and it leaks then it will probably leak when the glass is cleaned as well and to let them know before hand so they can avoid that area.

Crazy how things get blown out of proportion sometimes eh?


#14

I don’t see any wooden floors in the picture

Doors are always questionable, esp entry doors like that and if that has glass that opens inside the house, it will absolutely leak

even on commercial centers squeegeeing doors areas is advisable to minimize any potential issues


#15

Cry babies, that’s all people do these days cry and complain. If she would’ve grabbed a towel and wiped it up, it would’ve took less time than calling someone and making everyone else worry about nothing. I doubt it’ll leave any spots on an already ugly tile, lol. I think it’s stupid that they’re gonna wait till it dries to see if it leaves any spots, just wipe it up.


#16

BS! If that was my house I would be just as pissed. That’s not just a “little bit of water” when you consider taking care of someone’s home. we are absolutely responsible for water damage getting inside the home unless the homeowner is explained there is a risk of water getting inside and they agree anyways or sign a waiver.

As professionals it’s our job to know the risks and make sure the customer understands and ok’s the risk. If we don’t do our job informing them and allowing them to agree to the risk then it’s your ass and they have a right to go after you for the damage.

Whether something was damaged or not is not the point. It’s the principle of a lack of respect for someone else’s property that’s not yours to take risks with.


#17

Hmmmm ya " That’s just a little bit of water ". My dog leaves a bigger mess by his water bowl !
And it’s on a tile floor ! Give me a break already . Does life suck that bad that they have to complain ?

I would call ghost busters looks like slim

IMG_0282


#18

Thats the point. They didn’t hire a dog to clean the windows they thought they were hiring a professional and a professional doesn’t leave standing water inside someone’s home. It doesn’t matter if it’s a tile floor. It’s about respecting someone’s property. If I came home and found that on my floor I would never use them again. If I left that I would expect try customer to never call me again.


#19

So I’m a “dog” now?

I should mention that I moved my schedule around last minute to fit this customer in before thanksgiving. Not only that but they weren’t home at the time of cleaning.

I guess my bad for not breaking in to clean up a tiny puddle I had no idea was there?

“Whatapane”. Accurate name


#20

Ya ever hear the sayings “ Shit Happens “

“ I’m only Human “.

It happens has nothing to do with being professional. He is obviously a professional. Give me a break !!
So don’t use me again. Guess what you just lost one of the best window cleaners in town !!