Repetitive Strain Injury RSI


#21

There’s this tool too… Put some steel wool in it…
https://shopwindowcleaningresource.com/ettore-cleaning-clamp-kit.html

Also you can wrap steel wool around a t-bar and put it on a pole.
On a t-bar there is more pressure per square inch than an a flat tool.
Using a pole to steel wool the glass I find to be much less stressful on body parts.


#22

Yep, the last year of using Wags I went back to bare squeegee and separate lightweight scrubber. Problem solved. My go to now of course is Excelerator but in hand I use it bare as well. Wrist and elbow sorted.


#23

Try curling your fingers under, pinch the bronze wool between your thumb and curled index finger and then put the bronze wool to the glass. Now you can let your thumb and fingers rest as you apply pressure to the wool with your arm. The curled fingers create ridges of pressure on the glass. As I am right handed, I generally try to do most of the scrubbing with my left hand.



These are pictures of the Unger Clamp with bronze wool pads in them. Pictures 2 and 3 has the pad folded so it goes across the top of the clamp…this creates a nice flat surface, with hard edges to help get in the corners if need be.



These are pictures of a drywall sanding pad, I think that’s what they are, with 0000 White pads in them. I’ve had them for years…haven’t used them much because they can be a knuckle buster. But, they are better then nothing when your tired. Herman Wieland (He Man) has an idea, that if modified a little, would be great for a bronze wool pad.

Hope this was of help. Sorry for any writing error…have to write a proposal for early morning.


#24

For me it’s the upper back from all the scrubbing. The arms take the brunt for sure. It’s becoming more difficult to strech up for higher panes. In other words panes I could reach a year ago are getting harder to reach…


#25

He Man does it again


One of the take aways is, when poling try to keep your hands below head height.

If you want to try to minimize injury, and you like to read, there is some good info in the following pdf. (If you have employees and have to provide workmans comp you might want to read it. Shoulder injuries can have a long recovery time.)
http://www.osha.mddsz.gov.si/resources/files/pdf/39_cleaners_musculoskeletal_disorders.pdf


#26

Pole it…easier on the wrists, arms, back.


#27

I do a lot of times but not always for the ones just inches out of reach. From now on it’ll be coming off the truck more often for sure. Good advise.


#28

Has anyone here ever had a cortisone steroid injection? If so, did it work for pain?


#29

Back in the late 2000’s I had a cortisone shot and it worked wonders. I also did physical therapy to help with the recovery.


#30

Do you think it would relieve numbness in the arms?


#31

For me it did as the swelling that was causing the pressure was reduced. Check with your doctor and see what they suggest.


#32

the weight of a wet scrubber sleeve can be a problem. i use the very lightest/most effective as my daily scrubber [SYR tiger] and it never bothers me even on the busiest days .But if i switch over and use the heaviest sleeve i own, which is Ettore microfibre, im" feeling the burn" within ten minutes. id not ever let an employee use a heavy sleeve its asking for joint problems
whichever tool is causing you grief should be quickly sidelined for a different make in the search for one that suits your style/your way of working


#33

So talking about heavy sleeves is it a problem when using the newer Wagtail Scrubber Squeegee by hand??


#34

Hey IronLio Zion,
The exercise shown in this video worked for me. Read the details section too.

Before the exercises, at times I couldn’t lift my my biceps above my shoulders without discomfort. The nagging pain and numbness was annoying, espacially waking in the middle of the night due to the discomfort. Many nights I had to sleep in the recliner.
Once I started doing the exercises everytime my shoulders bothered me the popping in my shoulders started going away, along with the discomfort. I started sleeping in a bed again, too.


#35

Here’s a great post by @Samuel on fitness.


#36

my gut feeling is that once you go past the 12 inch size [of any squeegee ] the problems start if you use the bigger sizes as your main . my lads and i use a 13 as the main. in the van iv a couple of 14 inchers and if i happen to use one of these i straight away feel theres a diffrence its almost imperceptible but i feel it on my wrist . if you look at old timer fotos of men cleaning windows they are all using small sized squeegees now there must be a reason for that …

i know in the UK that anyone who uses a waterfed pole long term will have a real problem,the forums tell me that .


#37

Cortisone is just an anti-inflammatory, so if tissue inflammation is the cause, then yes.

Cortisone only treats the symptom, not the cause. It would be best if you could determine (possibly with help from a PT) exactly what is causing the issue in the first place. Then work to correct it.


#38

That is the one Samuel.
Avoid it in the first place.
What this mean??
Well relating to using squeegees by hand most people will all hold there squeegee one particular way.
But be able to adjust your grip / technique on handle as the surface is being squeegee.
Same using traditional pole.
When using WFP there are certain way’s you can make it easier to use them.
Just recently there is a set up you can wear to take most of the physical work using your Water Fed Pole.
As for excising seems a bit counter productive.
Not that I’m that young anymore LOL but if you find it hard to lift the pole long day and you over do it.
Would think that would aggravate it more?
I believe it all about being able to grip the squeegee handle many ways as you using squeegee and this could eliminate RSI altogether.


#39

Athlean-X is one of the best fitness channels i have found on YouTube.


#40

Exercising helps in several ways: 1. Stronger muscles are more resistant to injury. 2. It helps keep the muscles balanced since the repetitive motions often emphasize one muscle group while neglecting their counterparts. 3. The increased circulation of exercise helps transport waste away from the muscles and provides​ them with the nutrients they need to rebuild. 4. The endorphins released are natural pain killers. 5. Exercise helps reduce inflammation. 6. It stimulates the release of testosterone and human growth hormone, which both help rebuild muscle tissue.

Of course, you have to do the right exercise otherwise, yes, you can further aggravate an injury.