Reach-iT Water Fed Poles & Products - NOTICE


#89

Let the bells ring in the banners fly we have a winner ding ding ding!!!
Re Bugs Bunny: Where the heck do you think most of my information comes from?


#90

My understanding is wearing rubber sole footwear is the best thing you for that … obviously apart from doing anything stupid in the first instance.


#91

No…Rubber soled footwear will not save you from electrocution.


#92

but a suit of armour will.


#93

Without proper training, you could have a fully insulated suit and still bite the dust. Just don’t wfp near power lines.

Electricity always looks for a path out. While building a power substation I worked with some electricians. A some of them had weird marks on their arms, legs or whatever. When power hits you, it looks for a way out and blowing off an arm is a quick way out. One lady just lost a chunk of forearm muscle. She was lucky.

So if a fully licensed electrician who is used to working with 3 phase systems can get electrocuted, then chances are that a window cleaner can too.


Solar Panel Safety? What's the buzz?
#94

Electricity is a hunter, don’t be the hunted. Have some OSHA:

https://www.osha.gov/pls/oshaweb/owadisp.show_document?p_table=STANDARDS&p_id=19
• Title: Power line safety (up to 350 kV)–equipment operations.
1926.1408(a)(2)
Determine if any part of the equipment, load line or load (including rigging and lifting accessories), if operated up to the equipment’s maximum working radius in the work zone, could get closer than 20 feet to a power line. If so, the employer must meet the requirements in Option (1), Option (2), or Option (3) of this section, as follows:
1926.1408(a)(2)(i)
Option (1)–Deenergize and ground. Confirm from the utility owner/operator that the power line has been deenergized and visibly grounded at the worksite.
1926.1408(a)(2)(ii)
Option (2)–20 foot clearance. Ensure that no part of the equipment, load line, or load (including rigging and lifting accessories), gets closer than 20 feet to the power line by implementing the measures specified in paragraph (b) of this section.
1926.1408(a)(2)(iii)


#95

It will help I said …lol


#96

Yeah, about as much as trying to bail water with a tea cup on the Titanic :smirk: :stuck_out_tongue_closed_eyes:


#97

I bought a Facelift a few years ago and I have beaten the crap out of it and so far I only have one cracked clamp.The only brand I’ll buy is Facelift even if I have to buy it from Satan himself. How’s that for loyalty?


#98

The man has spoken ya’ll


#99

Good thing our Xero poles are private labeled Facelift poles.

They are simple and they work.


#100

I wish I had found all this before dropping so much money on a crap product with horrible customer service. I sent an email to these guys about warranty and all the trash that’s breaking. I didn’t even get a return email or phone call.


#101

Sorry that’s happening with you. I was verrrryyyyyy close to buying their product last fall. I’d likely be in the same boat!


#102

Unfortunately, most likely so. What did you end up getting?


#103

I have read a ton of info regarding this brand and it’s all either extremely positive or extremely negative.


#104

Lots of silly window cleaning politics involved.


#105

Yes, seems as window cleaners either like something or hate something not much room for in between


#106

Not into the wcing politics but those poles do seem to have more issues than others


#107

At minimum, it seems that they have a lot of great ideas…but I have experienced first hand the hazards of working for an ideas type of guy who isn’t wired together to be the guy that dots all of the i’s and crosses all of the t’s. Ready. Fire. Aim. Not saying that is the case with these guys, as I have no experience with them, but it’s pretty common for the entrepreneurial, outside the box types.


#108

So true . I’m not satisfied till I design the perfect pole ! Light stiff strong and cheep price ! What is difficult you either go for a cheap design with a thin wall thickness to keep price down like they do in the UK and replaced the pole every two years. Or you can copy the copy it design of 1.37 to 1.6 wall thickness and have a pole that last along time and does not break but is heavy with ud 55 HM and 3 k carbon fiber in it I think To understand design it takes reaseach but you might never know how your pole is made. Weight will help you understand the design you have with 63 Msi HM being one of the lightest types of carbon fiber but cost is very high to make endless you make it a very thin wall thickness. I could almost list what’s in most poles but I feel that is some thing you should ask the guy your buying your pole from . After $29,000 and 20 designs We have learned a lot about wfp but that knowledge is not easily shared with all different types poles being sold. The difficulty is many have there own design they push saying there’s is best but not sharing why except for perhaps stiffness . The Flex is key on how a pole is really made and I’m working on some type of meter to prove that flex . The best way now is have the pole at 45 feet and push against it and if it pushes back it a might be a good pole. Poles less the 25 feet it’s really all not nessary how it’s made because there is not much stress on the pole . 90% of the time I only used 6 foot pole!