Lucky?


#1

http://cosmos.bcst.yahoo.com/ver/251.6/popup/index.php?cl=5809740


#2

I used to think I’d like to do high rise work but after so many accidents I like my life on the ground.


#3

If you new the reason for most of these accidents you would not have a negative or fearful view of high rise window cleaning.

Any occupation is as safe as the workers make it.

Education, properly utilized safety equipment and common sense is mandatory.

99% of the accidents you hear about could have completely been eliminated or at least reduced the injury to bumps and bruises if the safety equipment would have been properly implemented.

There has been alot of fatal accidents regarding high rise recently, many of these accidents happen to large companies. As these companies direct employees out to job sights misguided and unskilled.

High rise should have a mandatory certification process to ensure the education and safe work practices are followed.

We just cant keep allowing companies to send unskilled uneducated workers out causing harm to themselves and the general public.


#4

Canada has this certification process.

No certification, jumbo fines and penalties if you get caught.


#5

Is the certification in Canada for all types of work storefront, residential,low and high rise commercial?

Do you know how long has this been enforced?

After this certification became mandatory since this would basically classify window cleaners into a “skilled Trade” did cost of window cleaning services increase due to this?


#6

Actually Canada, I think most provinces, Ontario being one of them has VERY strict rules and regulations governing every aspect of work. Businesses get inspected regularly by our ministry of labour to make sure workplaces are up to standards and that employees have been properly trained, and proper safety measures are in place to ensure employee safety. HUGE fines are in place for those that do not comply. Accidents happen, but when you think of it they can ALL be avoided.
I’m glad i don’t have employees yet, but it still does not stop me from having my own safety program in place for my own protection, as well as for the safety of anyone I may use as a sub for help on large scale jobs.

Kevin, have you had a visit from the MOL? They just hired a ton more inspectors, and were supposed to set a goal of visiting every employer in Ontario in 2007. If you haven’t met with them yet, probably in 2008 im guessing.


#7

[B]Crazy [/B]: I have not been inspected on-site, but for a LARGE job (Opera House downtown) I took the “pre-emptive” strike approach and drove myself out to the Ministry’s offices, and met with an Inspector to officially ask how they would like us to proceed. It was a smart move, since it helped me confidently rebuff foolish ideas from ‘experienced Project Managers’ that were overseeing the construction for the Main Contracting Company (billion-dollar company), and it provided me with a lot of education.

No surprise visits, though. As it stands, MOL regulations demand that any chair/stage/similar work be registered before the cleaning service has begun, each and every time. Address, scope, duration, etc, and I’ve done that each time it’s been needed…

And of course, a bunch of other stuff, too, that it would be boring and distracting to relate on this thread…

What you said is absolutely true, though, in the GTA. They hired a TON more inspectors in the last couple of years. Lots of revenue for the government, too, with fines for violations.