How would you price this job?


#1

So, I started doing some window cleaning to help save up some money for school. Also, I need something that is going to work around a school schedule so that I can still provide for the family while I go back.

That said, I’ve been cleaning condo windows, so no ladders or special equipment really needed. I just go into each of the units and clean the windows from the inside of the unit. I remove the panes, vacuum and clean the tracks, wash the screens and the each of the panes (interior and exterior sides) and put the windows back together.

I did some research on this site and came to the conclusion that the pricing would be:
$5 per pane for interior & exterior
$3 per screen

So, for example:
2 bedroom apartment/condo with 4 panes in each bedroom
4 sliding doors
6 panes beside the sliding doors
3 screens
Total $99 (charging $100 for it)

One of my customers referred a new construction residential customer to me. The person has built a huge home (76 panes of glass), no screens. However, the windows are not sliders, they are 3 panes side-by-side with a crank in the middle. So I will not be able to clean the exterior from inside the house so I would need an extended ladder to get to them. In addition, the whole window will need to be scraped with a razor blade scraper because there are little bits stuck, either mud, paint or even fly poop.

All I have for equipment so far is:

  • Shop vac for vacuuming tracks
  • scrub brush
  • 18" water/soap applicator
  • 18" squeegee (it can pivot to go vertical or horizontal)
  • 12" squeegee
  • 24" bucket
  • rags

I do have an extended ladder.

I would appreciate any help here. I don’t want to take on the job unless I will make some good money on it, but I don’t really know how to price it because of the scraping.

Also… The last thing. He wants me to clean the inside now to get ready for move in, but then do the outside in a couple of weeks so that he can get the excavation done outside first.


#2

You should have the right tools for the job - i.e. ladders, squeegees, clean razors (used judiciously), white pad scrubbers, magic eraser, etc.

We do not know the level of service that you provide, so your pricing may be fine, or it may be low. A lot can go into how you come up with your price structure…Insurance, tools and supplies, difficulty of standard job, CCU (construction clean up), exterior only; interior/exterior, tracks and screens.

Removing a window and cleaning it then replacing that window is a lot more work than it needs to be - there is a charge for that.

A window and a pane of glass (or 2 or more panes) that makes up a window may often times be priced differently. Most common “window” is the double hung with “2 panes of glass” - so are you pricing “per pane” or “per window”?

Couple things to help with that:

One side pricing


factor charge sheet.pdf (60.1 KB)


#3

@Garry, thank you for such a quick reply.

When you mention “level of service”, can you please give me an example. I like to think I offer great service, but I would love to hear what you think.

A couple of things:
So, based on the service factor charge sheet, it looks like you would double the cost of the cleaning charge if you were scraping paint, mud and fly poop off the inside of the window?

It also looks like my $5.00 per pane is pretty bang on to what your graphic showed (the way I counted the panes). But, would you charge those prices for ONE SIDE only as the graphic states? So, double it for in/out?

Also… What about the broken up appointment? Meaning how he wants me to do the inside now and the outside later? Would you do that? Would you charge extra for that? If you are just doubling it then it would matter?

Thanks in advance!


#4

Post construction cleans should be priced 2-3 times your normal rate. You could go more or less than that, depending on what you are cleaning off and how much of it.

I would suggest a ladder with a stand off or in the VERY least, mitts, and leg levelers of some sort for uneven ground.

“Level of clean” is really the amount of detail you put into the job. For example, some include tracks and sills in the price. I don’t, as I charge more for it. There is also (for me) different levels of cleaning tracks/sills. Low level is brush and vac. The high level is brush/vac and wash them out with a wet rag, detailing every CRUMB of dirt.


#5

As James mentioned, level of service would be offering anything from a simple wet down with the scrubber, squeegee off and minimal wiping of top and edge, (not a service that I offer), to a standard clean of scrub the window and frame clean, wipe down the frame, squeegee the glass, then detail what is needed of the edges after that. If there is years of dirt, debris, and paint splatter, I charge a little extra.

I mentioned “level of service” because it is unclear to me if you are using the terms “pane” and “window” as the same thing and therefore charging “per pane” or charging “per standard double hung window”. Example: $1 per pane = $2 per double hung window one side; $4 per double hung window both sides. I’m just confused because I often run into multiple paned windows and LARGE windows (one or two LARGE panes of glass, so I charge accordingly, but that is different than a standard window. Whew, conversations with finger tips takes more than just blurting out a few words…LOL


#6

@Garry, @HoosierSqueegee: Thanks again for your replies. That helps a lot.

I am counting the “panes”. So a double hung window would be 2 panes. However, if they are extra large panes then I’m counting them as more than one pane.

So, for example, most of his windows are about 3 or 4 panes of 20" wide by about 5’ high. So if there are 4 panes of those (so the window is 80" wide) then I would price it as 4 panes of glass (so $20).

Again, that was for in & out though (when I can access both from inside without ladders. I’m trying to figure out the pricing for both.

78 panes of glass @ $5 each for interior with scraping the paint off the window sound fair to you guys?

Then, when I come back I would charge the same $5 per pane because I have to climb a ladder to clean the outside?

Does that seem fair, high or low to you guys? As mentioned, I have no idea how long this will take me because I have not done residential homes yet.


#7

we would be at $1368 assuming half of the windows are 2nd story


#8

Thank you very much!


#9

Mr. Jim, Welcome to window cleaning. Good luck getting that figure from a contractor. Also, no one has mentioned that scraping can scratch glass, which you are liable for. Not trying to discourage you…I’ve been poo- pood for scraping glass, but it can work. A scratch waiver should be incorporated. If you don’t feel comfortable with this, it’s okay to pass and move on to easier residential, straight cleaning work. There is great money to be made with residential cleaning, and is a great, low level, lower stress way to make good money on your schedule. Congrats on already putting out good service. I would pass on new construction this early in the game and try to get residential referrals from present customers. Two cen. from fellow new guy.


#10

Hello… It’s funny that you say that. I sent that last “Thank You” message about 30 seconds after I turned down the job. I just have a strong feeling that this guy is going to be crazy picky and it is going to be impossible to satisfy him. In addition, he told me that he scratched his window using a scotch brite scrub pad. A few hundred dollars isn’t worth the risk IMO.

I do appreciate all the help you guys gave me though!


#11

Green pads are NOT recommended for glass. 3-M white pads are better for glass.
White scrub pad