Dog ear


#1

Does anyone else here dog ear or oterwise modify their channels? If so, how do you go about doing it and how well does it work?


#2

I only do it on smaller channels due to rubber wear.
Have a look here for some pics:
http://www.windowcleaningresources.co.uk/html/dog_earing_window_cleaning_tip.html


#3

So I had it bent a little too far. Just tried it on my steccone 14’ featherweight, its great! thanks,man:)


#4

Here is something I have done to almost completely elliminate the play in the rubber (movement of the rubber moving in and out of the channel, esp. in the middle). I took some 18 gauge solid core insulated copper wire and threaded it between the back of the channel and the bead of the rubber. I’m still pretty new to WCing so there may be better ways to deal with water riding under the rubber but this has worked well for me, esp, when closing out where the squeegee is more perpendicular to the


#5

From: craig aldrich <aldrich_craig@yahoo.com>
Sent: Wednesday, September 19, 2007 6:08:51 AM

I pinch one end to hold the rubber,this way no clips are needed.Furthermore if you notice standard brass clips fit REAL tight in a Steccone so…by doing away with the clips & pinching one end it makes changing out rubber a snap!!

I just use a pair of channel locks or a good needle nose plier and pinch the one end so the rubber stays snug.

Craig Aldrich
Sparkle Window Cleaning
Canyon Lake,Ca.


#6

I looked at the dog ear page and I’m curious, how far past the channel end should the rubber extend anyway, & what if the rubber where cut to the same length as the channel? Would it still behave the same?

I am relatively new to all of this.


#7

No worries Stud we all start somswhere;) It’s really personal preference how much excess rubber you leave. For me i like about a 16th of an inch where as others like a bit more.

One thing i notice is you are less likely to leave lines (if fanning) aka “fish tailing” i’ve also cut the rubber tight right to the channels end (prefer it on 6 or 8" channels)although…sometimes doing this will mare up some vinyl, wood & even metal frames because the channel is rubbing up against them.


#8

Thanks!
I have noticed that on some windows 2 “pulls” of an 18" are much faster than fanning for me. That’s just the lack of fanning experience or, are straight pulls sometimes faster?


#9

Absolutely! Alot of times it’s just plain faster to straight pull,as opposed to fanning especially on “hot glass” nevertheless…go with whatever works best for that particular situation.

Another thing worth adding is…when & if you dog ear your channels the more pronounced the bend the faster rubber will burn especially on the edges.

The flip side is…you rarely have to worry about channels riding up & over on certain seals of some windows.


#10

“Hot Glass” Here in Florida, there is nothing but hot glass.

Any tips on that?


#11

For what? WC or PC?
What problems. I live in Fl and might be able to help.


#12

One good tip is…less soap in your solution & work fast! That in itself will cut down on alot of aggravation;)


#13

another tip is…work with sun and try to start early in the summer.
I try to knock out most East facing windows before the sun becomes a beast, and same with the West outs.
I have found this to be a lot less frustrating:)


#14

Hey, David, glad to see you made it over.
Until PWI gets my window cleaning forum turned back on this is the place go for good info.
:slight_smile:

You better have listed me as your referrer.


#15

I always wondered how to go about dog earing the “proper” way. So I bought that “Advanced Window Cleaning Techniques” vid and it freakin’ ROCKS!

Showed me how to dog ear amongst other things. I thought because I average in between $50 and $60 per man hour there was nothing else I needed to learn.

BS…:eek:

I am so glad I got that video. Applying the principles in that video I can see me billing out $70 - $80 in the very near future.

I bought it to train my helpers… but ended up training myself.:cool:


#16

Have to agree - I find this tip helps me a lot.